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Daily Dose Of Jazz…

Larry Gales was born Lawrence Bernard Gales on March 25, 1936 in New York City and began playing bass at age 11. He attended the Manhattan School of Music in the late 1950s.  Moving into the early Sixties he worked with J.C. Heard, Eddie “Lockjaw” Davis, Johnny Griffin, Herbie Mann, Junior Mance and Joe Williams.

From 1964 to 1969 Larry was a member of the Thelonious Monk Quartet, and as such, recorded extensively and toured worldwide. After 1969, he relocated to Los Angeles, California where he worked frequently on the local scene with Erroll Garner, Willie Bobo, Red Rodney, Sweets Edison, Benny Carter, Blue Mitchell, Clark Terry, Teddy Edwards, and Kenny Burrell.

He recorded with Buddy Tate, Bennie Green, Sonny Stitt, Mary Lou Williams, Jimmy Smith, Sonny Criss, Charlie Rouse, Johnny Lytle and Big Joe Turner, among others. His first session as a leader was  A Message From Monk, released in 1990 on Candid Records that comprised one original and five Thelonious Monk tunes.

Double-bassist Larry Gales passed away on September 12, 1995 in Sylmar, California at 59 years old.

Discography[edit]

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The Jazz Voyager

The Jazz Voyager is heading to the airport to fly into Midway Airport in the Windy City to check out Greg Osby tomorrow at the infamous nightspot called the Green Mill Jazz Club. Located at 4802 N. Broadway St., Chicago, IL 60640 it is open from 12:00pm – 4:00am nightly and 5:00am on Saturdays.

Established in 1907 as Pop Morse’s Roadhouse, a bar and beer garden catering to mourners spilling from the nearby Graceland and Saint Boniface cemeteries. In 1910, the establishment became the Green Mill Gardens under the ownership of real estate developer Tom Chamales. During the Prohibition and Jazz Age years it was patronized by Al Capone and other mobsters and well-to-doers in Chicago and the clubs pedigree had no equal, proffering the best talent in the country.

The clubs notoriety has given it appearances in films like The Joker’s Wild,  Ocean’s 12, V.I. Warshawski, The Lake House, High Fidelity, The Break-Up and Prelude to a Kiss.

All types of jazz music are featured at the Green Mill including traditional, bebop, improvisational, contemporary and avant-garde.  For more info and reservations 773-878-5552.

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Daily Dose Of Jazz…

Steve Kuhn was born on March 24, 1938 in Brooklyn, New York City and began studying piano at the age of five. He studied under Boston, Massachusetts piano teacher Margaret Chaloff, mother of jazz baritone saxophonist Serge Chaloff. She taught him the Russian style of piano playing and at an early age he began improvising classical music.

As a teenager Steve appeared in jazz clubs in the Boston area with Coleman Hawkins, Vic Dickenson, Chet Baker, and Serge Chaloff. After graduating from Harvard University, he attended the Lenox School of Music where he became associated with Ornette Coleman, Don Cherry, and Gary McFarland. His professors included Bill Evans, George Russell, Gunther Schuller, and the members of the Modern Jazz Quartet. This experience with some of the most forward-thinking innovators of jazz improvisation and composition culminated with his joining trumpeter Kenny Dorham’s group for an extended time and for a brief time in John Coltrane’s quartet at New York’s Jazz Gallery club.

Kuhn has appeared or recorded with Stan Getz, Art Farmer, Oliver Nelson, Gary McFarland, Art Farmer, Joe Henderson, Scott LaFaro, Harvie Swartz, Pete LaRoca, Sheila Jordan, Billy Drummond, David Finck, and Miroslav Vitous. In 1967 he moved to Stockholm, Sweden where he worked with his own trio throughout Europe until 1971. Moving back to New York City he formed a quartet while continuing to play European gigs and appearing at the Newport Jazz Festival.

Known as an avant-garde pianist in his early career, he was associated with bassist Steve Swallow and drummer Pete La Roca during the Sixties that produced several notable recordings. He was part of the quartet on the landmark recording Sound Pieces led by saxophonist, composer, and arranger Oliver Nelson with bassist Ron Carter and drummer Grady Tate. Among other critically acclaimed recordings there was The October Suite composed by Gary McFarland for Kuhn and an ensemble which included strings, woodwinds, and reeds.

For decades he has led all-star trios that have included such players as bassists Ron Carter and David Finck, and with drummers Al Foster, Jack DeJohnette, and Joey Baron. Pianist Steve Kuhn is the composer of the jazz standard The Saga of Harrison Crabfeathers, has recorded several live albums at New York City jazz clubs and continues to lead a trio and compose.

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Atlanta Jazz Festival…2002

They gathered in Piedmont Park over Memorial Day for a weekend of jazz, barbecue, camaraderie and sunshine as they laid blankets and chairs on the lawn in front of the big stage. It was May 25th when the festivities began and they continued until the last note on May 27, 2002. It was not unusual, as a matter-of-fact, it became a common occurrence to see many festival participants in the commemorative T-shirts that were produced over the years. Celebrating the Atlanta Jazz Festival, the city produced an exhibit of the commemorative posters to mark the 25th anniversary.

This year was no less remarkable than the past years and in continuing the tradition jazz fans were given the opportunity to enjoy the talents of the Abbey Lincoln Quartet, Abebi Stafford, Bebel Gilberto, Ben Allison’s New Quartet, Carlos Washington & the Giant People Ensemble, D.D. Jackson Trio, Dan Baraszu, Darren Winters Ensemble, Dennis Springer, Ficciones, Jack West & Curvature, Jimmy Scott, Joshua Redman with Brian Blade & Sam Yahel, Living Daylights Trans-Atlantic, Lizz Wright, Marea Alta, Michel Camilo Trio, Miguel Romero, Mike Blackburn Trio, Mike Kelly, Moment’s Notice, Momentum, New Power Trio, Orquestra Nova Sound, Project Logic featuring DJ Logic, Ray Charles, Rio Negro, Ronny Jordan, Roy Haynes’ Birds of a Feather featuring Kenny Garrett, Nicholas Payton, John Patitucci & Dave Kikoski, Takana Miyamoto, Tommie Macon & the Gentlemen of Jazz, Winard Harper, Woody Williams Rhythmodics, World Mambo Mission, Xpressions, and Yusef Sharif

This year’s celebration of free jazz would not have been possible without the sponsorship and support of Anheuser-Busch, Publix Supermarkets Charities, Atlanta Coca-Cola Bottling Company, Wyndham Midtown Atlanta, AT&T, MARTA, JazzTimes, Atlanta Magazine, Rolling Out, Creative Loafing, Mundo Hispanico, WSB-TV, WABE-PBA, WCLK 91.9 FM, WJZZ, WVEE/V103 FM, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, and The Atlanta Livery Company.


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Daily Dose Of Jazz…

Albert Aarons was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania on March 23, 1932 and graduated from Wayne State University in Detroit, Michigan. Remaining in Detroit he began gaining attention as a trumpeter in 1956 and started working with Yusef Lateef and pianist Barry Harris in the latter part of that decade. After a period playing with jazz organist Wild Bill Davis, he went on to play trumpet in the Count Basie Orchestra from 1961 to 1969.

In the Seventies Aarons worked as a sideman for singers Sarah Vaughan and Ella Fitzgerald, worked with saxophonist Gene Ammons and was a  contributor to jazz fusion, playing on School Days with Stanley Clarke. He appeared with Snooky Young on the classic 1976 album Bobby Bland and B. B. King Together Again…Live.

He also worked with Brass Fever, Kenny Burrell, Eddie Harris, Gene Harris, Milt Jackson, Carmen McRae, Zoot Sims with the Benny Carter Orchestra, Frank Wess and Gerald Wilson. Trumpeter Al Aarons passed away on November 17, 2015 in Laguna Woods, California at age 83.

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