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Collector’s Alcove

Soul Fountain is an album featuring saxophonist Clifford Jordan which was recorded in 1966 and but not released on the Atlantic Records subsidiary Vortex label until 1970.

All compositions were composed by Clifford Jordan with the exception as noted: T.N.T. composed by Ben Tucker, Grady Tate and Bob Dorough, I’ve Got a Feeling for You, H.N.I.C. composed by Tate and Tucker, I Got You (I Feel Good) by James Brown, Caribbean Cruise, Señor Blues by Horace Silver, Eeh Bah Lickey Doo and Retribution composed by Abbey Lincoln.

The personnel included Clifford Jordan on tenor saxophone, flute, piano, Jimmy Owens – trumpet, flugelhorn, Julian Priester – trombone, John Patton – organ (tracks 6-8), Frank Owens – piano, organ (tracks 1-5), Ben Tucker – bass (tracks 1-5), Bob Cranshaw – bass, electric bass (tracks 1-5), Bobby Durham (tracks 1-5), Billy Higgins (tracks 6-8) – drums, Ray Barretto – congas (tracks 6-8), Joe Wohletz – bongos, percussion and Orestes Vilato – percussion (tracks 1-5)

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Collector’s Alcove

Cosmic Vortex – Justice Divine is the debut 1974 album by jazz pianist and keyboardist, Weldon Irvine. It explores the deeply spiritual and political landscape with a focus on lyrics and vocals in conjunction with elements of funk and improvisation.

Writing all of the compositions, Weldon included on this album Love Your Brother, Walk That Walk; Talk That Talk, Love Jones, I’ll Name It Tomorrow, Cosmic Vortex (Justice Divine), Quiet (In Memory of Duke Ellington), Let Yourself Be Free and Love Your Brother (Sanctified Version)” 1:30

To execute the task of giving this project life, along with himself on keyboards, soprano saxophone and vocals Irvine brought to the session Henry Grate, Jr., Cornell Dupree and Joe Caro on guitar, Bob Cranshaw, Gordon Edwards and George Murray on bass, Wesley “Gator” Watson, Jimmy Young, Lenny White and Chipper Lyles on drums, Napoleon Revels on percussion, Bud Johnson, Jr. on the congas and bongos, Gene Jefferson on tenor saxophone, Jimmy Owens, Roy Roman and Everett “Blood” Hollins on the trumpet, Bill Barnwell on flute, and on vocals he enlisted the talents of Nalo and Ojuleba.

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Daily Dose Of Jazz…

Esa Pietilä  was born on December 9, 1964 in Finland and started learning the saxophone as a youth, taking his inspiration from Eric Dolphy, Albert Ayler, Ornette Coleman and John Coltrane. He studied saxophone and composition in the Sibelius- Academy jazz department in Helsinki and privately in United States with David Liebman.

Pietilä started his career as a jazz musician and later on expanded his expression to many different musical genres. Performing with his jazz groups Liberty Ship and Esa Pietilä 3, he also has duo collaborations with contemporary classical & new music chamber musicians, and has soloed with chamber orchestras and other larger ensembles. He performs totally free improvisations at his solo concerts.

He has worked with conductors Esa-Pekka Salonen, Santtu-Matias Rouvali, with Avanti! Chamber Orchestra. Esa has premiered the saxophone concerto of Kalevi Aho, Eero Hämeenniemi and Pietilä´s concerto Graffiti Play for chamber orchestra & contemporary jazz trio.

His jazz collaborators have been Paal Nilssen-Love, Harvey Sorgen, Michael Jefry Stevens, Mathias Eick, Jeff Siegel, Karl Berger, Mark Helias, Brian Melvin, Heiri Kaenzig, Christoph Baumann, Baenz Öster, Franziska Baumann, Mike Nock, Ron McClure, Claudio Fasoli, Anders Begcrantz, Odean Pope, Hilmar Jensson, Raoul Björkenheim. Markku Ounaskari, Ulf Krokfors, Iro Haarla.

Saxophonist and composer Esa Pietilä, who in his home country, received the Yrjö Jazz award in 2016 for his original, genre-defying work in the field of avant-garde jazz, continues to work diversely in the field of contemporary music.

BRONZE LENS

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Daily Dose Of Jazz…

Rebecca Coupe Franks was born on November 27, 1961 in San Jose, California. It was natural that she started playing trumpet when she was ten, as her brother, mother, grandfather, and great uncle all were trumpeters.

A professional by the time she was 15, Rebecca moved to New York City saw her attending New York University from 1990 to 1991 and practicing on the roof of the music building overlooking Lower Manhattan.

In the early 1990’s, she made a strong impression with her two albums for the Justice label. Her 1992 release Suit of Armor included appearances by saxophonist Joe Henderson, pianist Kenny Barron and bassist Buster Williams. During the 2000s she self-released several records, including Exhibition: Tribute to Joe Henderson.

Trumpeter Rebecca Coupe Franks continues to compose, record, perform and tour with her Groovemobile, which is a five piece band playing a mix of r&b, jazz and soul.

GRIOTS GALLERY

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Collector’s Alcove

Ghetto Music is the 1968 debut album recorded by trumpeter Eddie Gale and released on the Blue Note label. The album seamlessly blends the new jazz of the ’60s with gospel, soul, and the blues. It was very much representative of the upheaval and turbulence in America at that time, being recorded just five months after the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr.

The Allmusic Guide awarded the album 5 stars and stated “The aesthetic and cultural merits of Eddie Gale’s Ghetto Music cannot be overstated. This is some of the most spiritually engaged, forward-thinking, and finely wrought music of 1968”.

Recorded at Rudy Van Gelder Studio, Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey on September 20, 1968. All five compositions are Gale originals: The Rain, Fulton Street, A Understanding, A Walk With Thee and The Coming of Gwilu.

The Band: Eddie Gale – trumpet, thumb piano, steel drum, bird whistle, Russell Lyle – tenor saxophone, flute, Jo Ann Gale Stevens – guitar, vocals, James “Tokio” Reid, Judah Samuel – bass, Richard Hackett, Thomas Holman – drums, Elaine Beener – lead vocals, Sylvia Bibbs, Barbara Dove, Evelyn Goodwin, Art Jenkins, Fulumi Prince, Edward Walrond, Sondra Walston, Mildred Weston, and Norman Wright – vocals.

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