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Daily Dose Of Jazz…

Larry Gales was born Lawrence Bernard Gales on March 25, 1936 in New York City and began playing bass at age 11. He attended the Manhattan School of Music in the late 1950s.  Moving into the early Sixties he worked with J.C. Heard, Eddie “Lockjaw” Davis, Johnny Griffin, Herbie Mann, Junior Mance and Joe Williams.

From 1964 to 1969 Larry was a member of the Thelonious Monk Quartet, and as such, recorded extensively and toured worldwide. After 1969, he relocated to Los Angeles, California where he worked frequently on the local scene with Erroll Garner, Willie Bobo, Red Rodney, Sweets Edison, Benny Carter, Blue Mitchell, Clark Terry, Teddy Edwards, and Kenny Burrell.

He recorded with Buddy Tate, Bennie Green, Sonny Stitt, Mary Lou Williams, Jimmy Smith, Sonny Criss, Charlie Rouse, Johnny Lytle and Big Joe Turner, among others. His first session as a leader was  A Message From Monk, released in 1990 on Candid Records that comprised one original and five Thelonious Monk tunes.

Double-bassist Larry Gales passed away on September 12, 1995 in Sylmar, California at 59 years old.

Discography[edit]

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Gene Taylor was born Calvin Eugene Taylor on March 19, 1929 in Toledo, Ohio.  Beginning his career in Detroit, Michigan he worked with Horace Silver from 1958 until 1963, then joined the Blue Mitchell Quintet, with whom he recorded and performed until 1965.

From 1966 until 1968, he toured and recorded with Nina Simone, including a Taylor composition she recorded titled Why? (The King of Love is Dead), written following the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr. He then began teaching music in New York City public schools.

Working with Judy Collins from 1968 until 1976, Gene made numerous television appearances accompanying Simone and Collins. He went on to record with Junior Cook, Barry Harris, Coleman Hawkins, Junior Mance, Eddie Jefferson, Eric Kloss and Duke Pearson.

Double-bassist and songwriter Gene Taylor never led a recording session before passing away on December 22, 2001 in Sarasota, Florida where he had been living since 1990.

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Junior Raglin was born Alvin Raglin on March 16, 1917 in Omaha, Nebraska. He started out on guitar but had picked up bass by the mid-1930s. He played with Eugene Coy from 1938 to 1941 in Oregon, and then joined Duke Ellington’s Orchestra, when Ellington returned to using two basses, then replaced Jimmy Blanton after his departure from the orchestra. He remained with Duke from 1941 to 1945.

After leaving Ellington, Raglin led his own quartet, and also played with Dave Rivera, Ella Fitzgerald, and Al Hibbler. He returned to play with Ellington again briefly in 1946 and 1955. Falling ill in the late 1940s, he quit performing;

Double-bassist Junior Raglin, who performed mainly during the swing era and never recorded as a leader, passed away on November 10, 1955 at age 38.

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Dave Green was born on March 5, 1942 in Edgware, London, England. His first public performances were with his childhood friend Charlie Watts in the late 1950s while in their teens. He went on to perform with Humphrey Lyttelton from 1963 to 1983, while also playing with the Don Rendell–Ian Carr band in the early 1960s, and went on to play with Stan Tracey.

After his departure from Lyttelton in the early Eighties, he led his own group, Fingers, featuring Lol Coxhill, Bruce Turner and Michael Garrick. He regularly backed visiting musicians from the United States at Ronnie Scott’s, including Coleman Hawkins, Ben Webster, Roland Kirk and Sonny Rollins.

He performed and recorded with Dave Newton, Didier Lockwood and Spike Robinson. In 1991, he was a founding member of Charlie Watts’s quintet, together with Gerard Presencer, Peter King and Brian Lemon. Since 1998, he has led a trio featuring Iain Dixon and Gene Calderazzo, and became a member of The ABC&D of Boogie Woogie, with Ben Waters, Axel Zwingenberger and Charlie Watts, performing at the Lincoln Center with Bob Seeley and Lila Ammons.

Continuing to perform and record, bassist Dave Green has released for albums as a leader and working with Ruby Braff, Tony Coe, Captain John Handy, Ben Webster, Buddy Tate, Peter King, Spike Robinson, Stan Tracey, Ken Peplowski, Acker Bilk, Scott Hamilton, Bob Wilber, Roy Williams, Brian Lemon, John Critchinson, Dave Cliff, Joe Temperley, Lol Coxhill, John Bunch, Dick Morrissey and the Michael Garrick Trio has released twenty-four albums as a sideman.

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Eddie Jones was March 1, 1929 in Greenwood, Mississippi and grew up in Red Bank, New Jersey. In the early 1950s with Sarah Vaughan and Lester Young.

From 1951 to 1952 he taught music in South Carolina before becoming a member of Count Basie’s orchestra in 1953, a relationship that remained until 1962. During this period he recorded frequently with this ensemble, and also played with Basie in smaller ensembles, featuring Joe Newman, Frank Foster, Frank Wess, Thad Jones, Ernie Wilkins, Milt Jackson, Coleman Hawkins, Putte Wickman.

Jones quit music in 1962, took a job with IBM, then later became vice president of an insurance company. By the 1980s he returned to jazz and played on and off in swing jazz ensembles. He recorded a couple of dozen albums with Dorothy Ashby, Count Basie, Bob Brookmeyer, Jimmy Cleveland, Milt Jackson, Hank Jones, Frank Wess and Ernie Wilkins.

Double bassist Eddie Jones passed away May 31, 1997 in West Hartford, Connecticut.

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